Fly Tying: The Simi Seal Bugger

Simi Seal Buggers
Simi Seal Buggers

Aside from being my go to streamer for the deep pools or swollen flows of the trout creeks, I have been having quite a bit of success in the urban ponds throwing green Simi Seal Buggers. John Rohmer originally started tying the Simi Seal Leech and his recipe can be found here. The Bugger is simply a variation of of this original pattern but it is my go-to streamer when nothing else seems to work.

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1. Bead on a hook. I prefer something in a size #12-8. These orange glass beads from the craft store seem to be the ticket.

6/0 Uni Thread
6/0 Uni Thread

(Whoever made this stuff should get a pat on the back…)

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2. Wrap thread back.

.025 Lead Free Round Wire
.025 Lead Free Round Wire
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3. Add a couple of turns of weighted round wire. 6 or 7 turns usually does the trick for me and if I have need to get my bugs deeper, I will add softweight to my line.

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4. Secure wire with thread wraps and then add a marabou tail. In John Rohmer’s original simi seal leech he uses simi seal for the tail. I think the marabou has more motion in the water so I prefer it. I purposefully tie the tails long as I think that it also gets more movement and if worse comes to worse I can always pinch some of the marabou off.

Arizona Simi Seal
Arizona Simi Seal

Accept no substitute…

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5. Dubbing loops are no fun.

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6. Dub forward. The messier the better. In Rohmers video, he takes a popsicle with a little bit of velcro on the end and tease out the fiber to give the leech more bugginess.

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7. Whip Finish.

Everyone loves the Simi Seal Bugger

Largemouth
Largemouth
Rainbow and Simi-Seal
Rainbow and Simi-Seal
Brown on a simi-seal
Brown on a simi-seal
Cat and Simi Seal - photo courtesy of Greg Madrigal
Cat and Simi Seal – photo courtesy of Greg Madrigal

Definitely check out Greg’s nets over at Sierra Nets…unbelievable works of art.

Carp/Koi
Carp/Koi
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24 Responses to “Fly Tying: The Simi Seal Bugger”

  1. Foul Hook

    Ben, you come up with some of the best fly adaptations I’ve seen. I’m gonna have to try this because I’ve been looking for a small but effective alternative to the Woolly Bugger.

    Reply
    • azwanderings

      Thanks Nick. I can’t really claim too much on this one. It is so much easier to tie up than a wooly bugger and honestly I think it fishes better too. Thanks for the kind words. Check out John Rohmer’s site for the real deal Simi-Seal dubbing…

      Simi-Seal

      Reply
      • Foul Hook

        Ordered my semi seal today, got black, dark olive, and brown. I have everything else, even some rubber legs to try out. I just have to find those glass beads…

        Reply
        • azwanderings

          Very cool. John has some great stuff there. Be sure to let me know how it ties up and fishes for you. Glass beads are at the craft stores. Those places are gold mines…

          Ben

          Reply
          • azwanderings

            I do. I like the orange bead (probably because I have a 500 pack) but also tie it with clear beads and the standard gold. The orange is my go-to…

            Ben

        • Utahflybum

          You can find those orange beads at just about any well stocked craft store. Toho makes a HUGE selection of them. I buy 14/0 thru 4/0 beads. Try the red black semi seal dub with a black maribu tail and a 6/0 or 4/0 purple bead. I use that pattern in spring run off or turbid lakes. If you want it to sink fast add lead wire or sub the bead for a tungsten cone.

          Reply
  2. David G

    Who needs the velcro and stick? Just put it into the water and the fish do a fantastic job of making it messy! I have a very similar version of this that I’ll have to share with you, it is almost identical.

    Reply
    • azwanderings

      I know. I feel the same way. I usually tie mine a little bulkier than Rohmer does, but to each his own. That’s what makes this sport so great. The main thing is having a pattern that you are confident in. Thanks man.

      Ben

      Reply
    • azwanderings

      Thanks Matt. I always have black and brown. The green seems to work best in the ponds I have been fishing too. I have been messing around with red, purple, and white as well. They all seem to catch fish but the black, brown, and green are my standards. I like tying in legs on these guys too. Long legs with lots of action in the water seem to generate some hard strikes.

      Ben

      Reply
    • azwanderings

      Thanks Bruce. It is a great winter pattern for me. And it’s the first pattern I turn to when I can’t find any of my usual action.

      Ben

      Reply
  3. Jack

    Ben,

    Food for thought~

    A small tungsten cone is all the weight ever needed and any color will suffice.

    Reply
  4. Greg

    Ben I have a new addition for this post-A nice fat carp! Thanks again for this go-to pattern. (In rust color)

    Reply
  5. Tom

    Do you dead drift these for trout, or swing/strip them. I’ve never had any luck fishing streamers for trout, but would like to give them a try. Thanks

    Reply
    • azwanderings

      Tom,

      If I have a fast enough current, I’ll dead drift them. If it’s a slow pool, I’ll strip them. Big rivers, I’ll swing them. Fishing streamers for trout can produce some really nice fish. Good luck.

      Ben

      Reply
  6. Rodney

    Great looking bugger, I’m going to tie some up myself! What length hook do you use 2x, 3x? Also what size bead? Thank you much!

    Reply

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